The South Side: A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation (Natalie Y. Moore)

"I unconsciously knew that Chicago's blacks, whites, Latinos and Asians generally didn't live together. I certainly never saw any non-blacks living in Chatham. But growing up in segregation felt like air and water — a constant, but something I never pondered until a small incident upended my detachment."

"I unconsciously knew that Chicago's blacks, whites, Latinos and Asians generally didn't live together. I certainly never saw any non-blacks living in Chatham. But growing up in segregation felt like air and water — a constant, but something I never pondered until a small incident upended my detachment."

U.S.A. / 2016

From Goodreads: "In this intelligent and highly important narrative, Chicago-native Natalie Moore shines a light on contemporary segregation on the South Side of Chicago through reported essays, showing the life of these communities through the stories of people who live in them. The South Side shows the important impact of Chicago's historic segregation - and the ongoing policies that keep it that way." Shoutout to @art_of_elle for this recommendation!!Anyone that has been to Chicago knows that it consists of two (or more), very separate worlds. I lived in the area until I was six, and when I moved north to Milwaukee, I used to dream of returning. My memories were of the tall buildings, the beautiful storefronts on Michigan Avenue. However, as I got older and came back to the city with increasing frequency, I came to decide that I could never live in Chicago as an adult. I think it would require too much cognitive dissonance. Nonetheless, I think of Chicago as an extremely important site, mostly due to its status as the final, settling stop for many Black folks during the Great Migration - my ancestors included. Check out this book!

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