Your Blues Ain't Like Mine (Bebe Moore Campbell)

“In all his imaginings, he had never envisioned her crying. He knew that her son had died, but he'd never expected that her pain might be anything he could recognize, almost as though he believed that Negroes had their own special kind of grieving ritual, another language, something other than tears they used to express their sadness.” 

“In all his imaginings, he had never envisioned her crying. He knew that her son had died, but he'd never expected that her pain might be anything he could recognize, almost as though he believed that Negroes had their own special kind of grieving ritual, another language, something other than tears they used to express their sadness.” 

U.S.A. / 1992

This book is so vibrant and honest. It's about a teenage Black boy from Chicago who goes down to Mississippi to visit family for the summer and is murdered for "sweet-talking" a White woman. Sound familiar? Only thing is that this boy's name is Armstrong- not Emmett. This story is actually a historical fiction interpretation of the Emmett Till story It weaves in all points of view -- from the murdered, to the mourning, to the murderer. I used to love reading this book when I used to visit my own great-grandparents in Mississippi. Moore was such a talented writer. Give it a look! 

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