Olio (Tyehimba Jess)

"The slave's hands dance free, unfettered, flying across ivory, feet stomping toward a crescendo that fills the forest pine, reminding the Rebs what they're fighting for -- black, captive labor."

"The slave's hands dance free, unfettered, flying
across ivory, feet stomping toward
a crescendo that fills the forest pine,
reminding the Rebs what they're fighting for --
black, captive labor."

U.S.A. / 2016

This is an excerpt from the poem, "Blind Man Plays for Confederate Troops, 1863." Tyehimba Jess is a poet, author, and professor with a BA from uChicago and a MFA from NYU. His poetry is renowned for its cultural heritage and for its colloquial qualities. Olio was released just two weeks ago, after much buzz. According to his publisher, Wave Books, Olio contains "ambitious manipulations of poetic forms" and "Tyehimba Jess presents the sweat and story behind Americaโ€™s blues, worksongs and church hymns. Part fact, part fiction, Jess's much anticipated second book weaves sonnet, song, and narrative to examine the lives of mostly unrecorded African American performers directly before and after the Civil War up to World War I. Olio is an effort to understand how they met, resisted, complicated, co-opted, and sometimes defeated attempts to minstrelize them." I really recommend his poetry. He reminds me of one of my favorite poets: Jean Toomer. ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ“•๐ŸŒธ๐Ÿ˜š

Source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BEbg2M0xiTM/?t...