South Side Girls: Growing Up in the Great Migration (Marcia Chatelain)

"When our children went into those white schools, them white people wanted to know everything about then, their mamas and daddies and what was going on in they home, even if nothing appeared to be wrong."

"When our children went into those white schools, them white people wanted to know everything about then, their mamas and daddies and what was going on in they home, even if nothing appeared to be wrong."

U.S.A. / 2015

"In South Side Girls Marcia Chatelain recasts Chicago's Great Migration through the lens of black girls. Focusing on the years between 1910 and 1940, when Chicago's black population quintupled, Chatelain describes how Chicago's black social scientists, urban reformers, journalists and activists formulated a vulnerable image of urban black girlhood that needed protecting. She argues that the construction and meaning of black girlhood shifted in response to major economic, social, and cultural changes and crises, and that it reflected parents' and community leaders' anxieties about urbanization and its meaning for racial progress. Girls shouldered much of the burden of black aspiration, as adults often scrutinized their choices and behavior, and their well-being symbolized the community's moral health." – summary from GoodReads // Marcia Chatelain is Assistant Professor of History at Georgetown University.