Black Boy (Richard Wright)

"Whenever I tried to sleep I would see huge wobbly white bags, like the full udders of cows, suspended from the ceiling above me. Later, as I grew worse, I could see the bags in the daytime with my eyes open and I was gripped by the fear that they were going to fall and drench me with some horrible liquid."

"Whenever I tried to sleep I would see huge wobbly white bags, like the full udders of cows, suspended from the ceiling above me. Later, as I grew worse, I could see the bags in the daytime with my eyes open and I was gripped by the fear that they were going to fall and drench me with some horrible liquid."

U.S.A. / 1945

There are many beautiful covers of Black Boy, but this one is my favorite because it's the cover of the edition I first read at age 14. Fun fact: I was the only black person in that English class and the teacher insisted that everyone say "nigger" during our class read-aloud sessions. Ah...fun times. Anyway, there's a reason this book is so embedded in the American literary canon—and school curricula. Although it is a memoir, Wright managed to use his single experience to embody the turmoil of wearing black skin in America. This quote has stuck with me for almost a decade now. I think about it often. Something about the imagery of the udders and the milk bags dreamt up by a boy beaten by mother figures is exceptionally heartbreaking. 

Source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BR0_EX8BiML/?t...