So Long a Letter (Mariama Bâ)

“Friendship has splendors that love knows not. It grows stronger when crossed, whereas obstacles kill love. Friendship resists time, which wearies and severs couples. It has heights unknown to love.”

“Friendship has splendors that love knows not. It grows stronger when crossed, whereas obstacles kill love. Friendship resists time, which wearies and severs couples. It has heights unknown to love.”

Senegal / 1979

After Ramatoulaye's husband dies, she must observe four months and 10 days of mourning, per tradition. As she copes with his death—and his painful betrayal—she writes to her best friend, Aissatou, trying to heal, gain strength, and understand women's fate in Senegalese society. Originally written in French, So Long a Letter was Mariama Bâ's first novel. Born 1929 in Dakar and raised Muslim by traditional grandparents, she struggled throughout her life to accept the inferior roles she felt women were forced to take on. Thus, her writing tended to examine and criticize gender inequality in West Africa. She reminds me of the late, greats Buchi Emecheta (Nigeria) and Lauretta Ngcobo (South Africa)—women writers who also explored gender inequality in their novels.