Na Minha Pele (Lázaro Ramos)

"'People like us have to carry ourselves more tidily.' The phrase 'like us' said everything and nothing at the same time. Dindinha used to slick her hair back, carefully imprisoned. The only make-up she used was rice powder that made her skin look slightly gray. The girls in my family always had tight braids. Even my hair was very short, parted and slicked to the side. And I lived with white powder on my neck, in order to 'smell nicely.' I thought it was strange, but I never said anything."

"'People like us have to carry ourselves more tidily.' The phrase 'like us' said everything and nothing at the same time. Dindinha used to slick her hair back, carefully imprisoned. The only make-up she used was rice powder that made her skin look slightly gray. The girls in my family always had tight braids. Even my hair was very short, parted and slicked to the side. And I lived with white powder on my neck, in order to 'smell nicely.' I thought it was strange, but I never said anything."

Brazil / 2017

In his first book, Lázaro Ramos—one of Brazil's most prominent actors—discusses race in Brazilian society. He recounts his own experiences growing up the son of a maid within a household where the term "black" was never used and also writes about breaking into Brazil's incredibly whitewashed television industry.